Breast Cancer Affects Everyone

All people, whether male or female, are born with some breast cells and tissue. Even though males do not develop milk-producing breasts, a man’s breast cells and tissue can still develop cancer. While male breast cancer is very rare, only one in a thousand men will ever be diagnosed with breast cancer. 

Breast cancer in men is usually detected as a hard lump underneath the nipple and areola. Men carry a higher mortality than women do, primarily because awareness among men is less and they are less likely to assume a lump is breast cancer, which can cause a delay in seeking treatment

One in eight women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime. Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. 

While you can't prevent cancer, it is important to be proactive about your health. Visit nationalbreastcancer.org for more important facts about the myths and known risk factors regarding breast cancer. 

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FAQs

My spouse and I are legally separated. Can I remove my spouse from my coverage?

Your spouse’s coverage ends if you get divorced or if your marriage is annulled. If you are separated but still legally married, your spouse is still covered. You can remover him or her during the annual open enrollment.  Your domestic partner loses coverage when your relationship no longer meets the criteria for a domestic partner relationship.

If you and your spouse are divorced, you should notify the Health & Welfare Plan Office immediately. If you fail to remove your divorced spouse from the Plan, you could be liable for any expenses claimed by your former spouse after the date of the divorce. For more information, see the Life Events page.

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