Migraines Are More Than Just Pain and Discomfort

Almost one-third of migraine sufferers experience moderate to severe disability. The head pain and other migraine symptoms make it difficult for many to function during attacks. Migraines are a leading cause of disability around the globe. Despite that, half of those with migraines aren’t under a doctor’s care for the condition.

Migraines impact almost every facet of a sufferer’s life, and people with migraine or severe headaches are even at increased risk for suicide.

Often, people with migraines report a lower quality of life, have trouble sleeping, cancel social engagements and miss days from work and school because of attacks. They have also been found to have less energy between migraine attacks.

Some migraine sufferers wait in worry or fear of when the next migraine attack will surface. So even during symptom-free periods, people with chronic migraines may curb their activities, eat cautiously or be on edge in anticipation of a painful episode. This also has a negative effect throughout a person’s life.

A 1995 Swedish study compared people with migraines to those without migraines. The migraine sufferers – even between attacks – had more:

  • Emotional distress
  • Disturbed contentment
  • Less vitality
  • Problems sleeping

There are many options to get help for living with migraines, from migraine doctors to joining a patient support group. If you feel you are experiencing a migraine crisis, be sure to seek help from a counselor or the emergency room.

 

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My spouse and I are legally separated. Can I remove my spouse from my coverage?

Your spouse’s coverage ends if you get divorced or if your marriage is annulled. If you are separated but still legally married, your spouse is still covered. You can remover him or her during the annual open enrollment.  Your domestic partner loses coverage when your relationship no longer meets the criteria for a domestic partner relationship.

If you and your spouse are divorced, you should notify the Health & Welfare Plan Office immediately. If you fail to remove your divorced spouse from the Plan, you could be liable for any expenses claimed by your former spouse after the date of the divorce. For more information, see the Life Events page.

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