Depression is a Serious Illness

October is National Depression Awareness Month. Sixteen million people in the U.S. live with major depression. 

Depression is more than sadness. We all feel sad from time to time. It’s a normal temporary reaction to upsetting experiences in life. Depression is different. When a person has depression, it interferes with daily life—eating, sleeping, working and more. It affects not just the person with depression, but also those who care about them. Most people who experience depression need treatment to get better.

Depression is not a sign of weakness or a character flaw. If you are suffering with depression, help is available. Call the National Alliance on Mental Illness at: 1800-950-NAMI (6264) Monday - Friday from 10 am - 6 pm. 

 

Read all news

Downloads Icon

Related Documents and Links

FAQs Icon

FAQs

Do my spouse and I need to sign up for Medicare?

When you or your spouse becomes eligible for Medi­care, you should enroll in Medicare Parts A and B. For most people, enrollment in Medicare Part A is automatic (there is no premium) when you start receiving benefits from Social Security. You should sign up for Medicare Part B with the Social Security office three months before turning 65. Your monthly premium to Medicare for Part B will be deducted from your Social Security check.

When you become eligible, you are not required to enroll in Medicare Part B, but benefits will be paid by the Plan as if you are enrolled. This means that, if you do not enroll, you or your spouse will have higher expenses because you will be responsible for paying for the benefits Medicare Part B would have covered. After you submit evidence of your Part B enrollment for yourself or your dependent, your HEALTH & WELFARE Plan premium will be reduced. For more information, visit the "If You Become Eligible for Medicare" section on the Life Events page.

View All FAQs